Reviews

Lumb Brothers 'Crab Hook'

Ooooooh dear I can feel the arm-chair eco-warriors start to bristle but these hooks have more uses than simply 'hawking' various edibles out of their holes!

Indeed the name of crab hook can be a bit of a misnomer, anyone who has read my articles on lobstering, the last one as per the link below:

http://duo-divers.com/diary/66-zen-and-the-art-of-lobstering-part-4

Will know that as soon as you start trying to extract a crustacean from it's hole, forcibly with a hook then it will start shedding legs and claws, not good if you manage to get it out and even worse if you fail, partially dismembered crabs and lobsters die in the wild, that's a given, so don't do it!

So apart from lobstering what use a hook? Ok, it's a useful implement for temporarily securing yourself to the sea-bed if you are progressing through surf or surge, my old fella would move along using his hook rather than fin, it uses less energy to move this way which means less air which in turn means a longer dive time.

Assuming that you want a hook, either for movement or lobstering is this one any good, yes!

It is stainless steel constructing with a nice chunky plastic handle so nothing will rust or rot, a dowside is that there is no lanyard in the package so you will need to buy one but that's not the end of the world.

One feature that I don't like is that of the hook being reversible to give a 'spike' which can be used to skewer fish, bearing in mind the magnification underwater I catch fish by hand if there are any of any size, this means that if they are too small they can be released no worse for wear. If you spear a flatfish or angler-fish it's as good as dead so don't do it!

I don't like this spike at all so I have ground off the sharp end as I don't wish to be impaled if the thumb nut which allows you to change from hook to spike comes loose, also I'm clumsy as hell and would probably do myself an injury when carrying my bag.

crab hook

Not the best of Photos, the rule is 6 inches!

There are arguments for longer hooks but these are no use for propulsion and unless you are an experienced hunter gatherer they don't give any real benefit over this one, I consider myself an expert forager, or as described by Dougie of Aquanauts 'a bottom feeding scavanger', and this one is fine for me and there are maybe only 10 dives per year that I would like a longer implement.

The other argument on crab hooks are the 'shape' of the end, this one is a traditional round end although there are times when a straight end piece bent at 90 degrees could be better, again I have no problems with this design and you are unlikely to impale yourself on a round end which is a good thing!

http://www.lumb-bros-das.co.uk/cgi-bin/sh000001.pl?REFPAGE=http%3a%2f%2fwww%2elumb%2dbros%2ddas%2eco%2euk%2facatalog%2findex%2ehtml&WD=crab%20hook&SHOP=%20&PREVQUERY=SS%3dcrab%2bhook%26PR%3d%2d1%26TB%3dA%26SHOP%3d%20&PN=Miscellaneous%2ehtml%23a322#a322

All in all a useful addition to a UK divers kit bag and at £11 for the crab hook and £3 for a lanyard it won't break the bank.

Richies rating : 9/10 : the only downside is the spiked end.

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